Course's description
Contents and objectives
Course Organisation

Course's description
Contents and objectives
Course Organisation

Course's description
Contents and objectives
Course Organisation

Architecture and Reality
in the Quantum Era
Specialisation in Historical Analyses, Survey of Architectural Heritage,
Architectural Restoration
Architecture in Wood: design, construction, restoration
Architecture and Reality in the Quantum Era
Today’s reality: living bodies (about 7 billion, 211 million) and an adequate number of empty spaces, spread across the planet, in the necessary quantities for those bodies to comfortably perform various activities.
Living bodies, which today, thanks to their technological appendages, extend into space to the limits of their sensors and remote commands, generating a huge and complex rapidly expanding community. Empty spaces (whose composition generates buildings, of which a part is architectural art) that each day are more corporeal, thanks to the sensitivity and changeability permitted by new technologies. But that is not all. Today, every building is part of a dynamic system. Buildings are also becoming part of a gigantic interactive community. Just as for the bodies that live in them, buildings can also be described (and devised) with reasonable precision by way of the teachings of classic Newtonian physics; but to investigate the global context (the mega-community) in which the building (like the living body) is included, this is no longer enough.
To investigate the transitions of phases, critical points and emergencies, the definition of constants in complex systems and many other physiological characteristics of today’s reality, quantum physics is necessary. Those scientific reflections that for a hundred years or so have sat in a drawer and for twenty or so years now, guide technological and scientific research of humanity.
This use in particular is motivated by increasingly frequent discoveries (sometimes mere verification) of the fact that ‘things’ are not what they seem; by the fact that our senses (extraordinary and unapproachable chemistry/electronic laboratories) truly produce extraordinary quantities of highly sophisticated data, but are not at all interested in the problem of referring to us precisely what reality is. This discovery isn’t popular with everyone (understandably), but it has been fundamental in starting to question some of those that are suffocating life on the planet.
Quantum physics, the science of complex systems and all the various mathematical and biological conjugations of the problem, can teach us to reconsider what we, all too often taking it for granted, actually think ‘reality’ is. And reconsidering reality means questioning the methods of defining the so-called ‘fringe conditions’, according to which it has always been thought (and done, since the ancient Greeks) necessary to base design and creation of a building.
The thought of using a biometric skin in a building is no longer science fiction, nor is conceiving a structure that is not exclusively static or making it independent in adjusting to changing environmental conditions (light, temperature, etc.).
Seeing a building as a system of cyclical intelligent feedback must become the norm in construction that can adapt coherently to the above mentioned reality. And architecture must adapt to this.
As far as new directions that we propose exploring on the course are concerned, these are the result of questions relating to technological issues and those of the planet that hosts us. What results from this are new territories of research that permit defining an architecture that is intimately connected not only to the problems of man and environment, but moreover to the most significant discoveries of our time. We believe the idea that our architecture, which records this era, is composed of a ‘matter’ that is neither the form nor the function, but moreover the abstract (traditionally) concept of relation, meant as the capacity to articulate connections (networks) in space. An architecture which, instead of composing and posing in space, objects that are in themselves complete, autonomous and monumental, will act starting from a neutral initial condition to then generate instable landscapes, structurally open to negotiation, to transformation and life (that is to dynamic balances of the living world), to then return, once it’s duty has been performed, to the original neutral condition, ready for a new configuration.