Course's description
Contents and objectives
Course Organisation

Course's description
Contents and objectives
Course Organisation

Course's description
Contents and objectives
Course Organisation

Architecture and Reality
in the Quantum Era
Specialisation in Historical Analyses, Survey of Architectural Heritage,
Architectural Restoration
Architecture in Wood: design, construction, restoration

Architecture in Wood: design, construction, restoration

 

Although it is the first construction material adopted by man because of easy availability, easy manipulation, and thanks to its characteristics of resilience and pliancy, wood in Mediterranean countries is currently associated solely to traditional construction in northern Europe, architecture in the alps, temporary structures or simple finishing features.
Rarely is wood seen as material that is suited to long-lasting prestigious buildings, for daring and original structural solutions or for its admirable thermo hygrometric behavior.
It is wrong to associate wood to traditional picturesque building types or cheap bio architecture; equally it is wrong to think it solely suited to cheap temporary constructions.
Now that preferences for synthetic and artificial surfaces and have diminished, designers are beginning to discover the warmth and emotion that wood, as a natural living material, gives the architectural construction. Easy and rapid to install, advantageous and accompanied by excellent environmental credentials, it is no surprise that architectures themselves describe wood as “the new concrete”.

It is necessary, however, to clarify that it is not automatically an “ecological” material: it is obtained by sacrificing large areas of forest, the best woods derive from slow growth (from many decades to a century or more) and at the end of its lifecycle not all material that is used can easily be recycled, particularly the part that must necessarily be treated to protect the construction from water and other pathogenic agents. Consider also that only a third of the trunk (the lower part) provides prestigious wood, whilst the second third provides low quality wood, and wood from the third part of the trunk (the upper part) is used for burning. Lastly between 30 and 50% of felled timber is material that is more or less unusable (twigs and leaves). Wood therefore is an extremely precious material, which, in order to be called biocompatible has to be used with discernment and requires rigorous protection policies for exploitation of the forest patrimony so as to avoid its use provoking indiscriminate exploitation of the (few) complete forests still left on our planet.
With this Master course we intend to provide a serious opportunity for preparation and specific direct action that will generate skills in the field of wood constructions. Following an initial study phase of main technological emergencies, this direct action will lead us to analyse study workshops, to define intervention proposals for hypotheses of new construction and requalification of existing ones, to elaborate economically sustainable and technically innovative proposals, in order to promote, with direct action or through Master students, the culture of building in wood for public bodies, great investors in the real estate field and the small private clients.